Tag Archives: Centenary

Remembering 9348 CQMS Frederick William Jones Killed in Action 29/30th July 1916

XIV Pln D Coy - Book of HonourCompany Quartermaster Sergeant Jones enlisted in the 17th Battalion on 23rd February 1915. This was during the drive for further recruitment when the Pals Battalions were seeking a fifth E Company. Recruitment was opened up to men with skills or trades suited to Army life. This was a significant extension to the original requirement of being a clerk or warehouseman.  His Service Record helps build a picture of the men in his Battalion.

Arthur Bell recognised the importance of these men. “Throw a lot of clerks and countermen into a complex organisation like an army, with only a few ex-Boer War men, and where are you?  No wonder an invitation was issued to bakers, candlestick-makers and coppers to join up.”
Frederick was an experienced carpenter, who had a reference provided by Peace V Norquoy Limited of New Islington Works, Union Street, Ancoats. He had been employed with them for five years and had earlier served in the Royal Navy.
At 37 years and six months, Frederick was much older than the average recruit; with the majority of recruits being single, it was also an exception for Frederick to be married with children. He had married Nellie Shutt at Weslyan Chapel, Grosvenor Street on 15th July 1905. The couple and three children, Wilfred, Doris & Frederick William, lived at 1 Roseneath Avenue, Levenshulme. His mother Mary Fox Jones lived at 12 The Crescent, Levenshulme with younger brother Harold Thomas and Sister Constance Gertrude Jones. The elder brother Edwin Ernest lived at Bramhall.
Previous military experience, maturity and his trade experience led to Frederick’s early promotion to the post of Pioneer Sergeant. He trained with XIV Platoon in D Company. The Battalion’s assault on Montauban led to significant losses, especially among the NCOs. Frederick was promoted CQMS on 1st July, as a replacement for one of these casualties.
CQMS Jones was Killed in Action on 29th or 30th July 1916, during the advance on Guillemont. He is buried in PERONNE ROAD CEMETERY, MARICOURT. Grave registration suggests he died on 29/7/1916, which could relate the evening before the assault on Guillemont when the Battalion moved up from Cambridge Copse and assembled between Bernafay and Trones Woods. Frederick had originally been buried close to the track leading to Carnoy from Maricourt and the southern end of Talus Bois. Therefore it’s possible he was killed in the initial assembly positions at Cambridge Copse. Alternatively he may have been wounded later and there may have been a Casualty Clearing Station close to his original burial place. SDGW specifies Killed in Action, rather than Died of Wounds, but these records are regularly inaccurate. Most initial 30th July burials were more than 1 mile to the north east.
Nellie received Frederick’s Effects in September 1917. This included a tobacco pouch, Cigarette Case, wrist watch, purse, pipe and pipe lighter. Nellie thought some items were missing. The War Office awarded her a Pension of 22/ per week in February 1917.

Remembering 9519 Private Ruben Schofield 17th Manchesters KiA 1/7/1916

The Centenary of Ruben’s Death at Montauban.

17th Battalion Manchester Regiment on the Somme

Roll of Honour showing the names of the men in the Platoon.   This includes Arthur Bell and Robert Schofield.  Ruben joined the Battalion soon after. Roll of Honour showing the names of the men in the Platoon. This includes Arthur Bell and Robert Schofield. Ruben joined the Battalion soon after.

Courtesy http://www.salfordwarmemorials.co.uk/uploads/1/7/1/8/17184026/adelphi_roh.pdf Courtesy http://www.salfordwarmemorials.co.uk/uploads/1/7/1/8/17184026/adelphi_roh.pdf

This blog regularly returns to the original recording and notes of 8055 Private Arthur Bell. Efforts continue to be made to identify the people and places referred to in Grandad’s notes. This post concerns the identification of 9519 Ruben Schofield as the brother of 8284 Private Robert Schofield of III Platoon. Ruben was killed at Montauban on 1st July 1916. Here’s Arthur Bell’s note about his return to happy valley on 3rd July 1916:-
“Our lot were under canvas, and we were told what heart-breaking roll-calls there had been. One particular man in our platoon had lost the younger brother whom he had been at great pains to have transferred from another battalion.”
Service Records show Ruben transferred to 17th Manchesters on 11/4/1915…

View original post 377 more words

Shrove Tuesday 1915 – 17th Manchesters Recruitment March

© THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

© THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Shrove Tuesday 1915, the 17th Battalion Manchester Regiment were marching through their City on a recruitment march.  A year later they were sat in the trenches and mud on the Somme.

See Heaton Park, Manchester | 17th Battalion Manchester Regiment on the Somme. for 1915

Maricourt Defences – Somme | 17th Battalion Manchester Regiment on the Somme for 1916

The 17th Battalion Manchester Regiment arrived in Boulogne 100 years ago

© IWM (Q 6479)

Troops disembarking from the leave boat at Boulogne, 30 January 1918.© IWM (Q 6479)

An advance party had arrived in France on 7th November 1915. The core of the Battalion then left Larkhill  in two trains from Amesbury to Folkestone on the following day.  They crossed the Channel and spent the first night in Boulogne.  It was raining heavily and despite the presence of tents everyone was “soaked through to the skin” (Bert Payne IWM).

This was the beginning of their Service on the Western Front.  Almost one third of these men did not return Home.

Crown Copyright

Crown Copyright

The first 17th Manchesters go Overseas – Centenary 7th November 1915

On this day 100 years ago three Officers and 109 men left Larkhill Camp on Salisbury Plain and travelled by train to Southampton.  They crossed the Channel with the Regimental Transport and became the first Group of the 2nd Manchester Pals to arrive in France at Le Havre. See Arrival and travel through France

Crown Copyright

Crown Copyright